Archive Page 2

Journal of the Month: ImagineFX

ImagineFX April

ImagineFX is a trade magazine for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Digital Artists, and it is a recent addition to the library’s collection. Published in Bath, UK by Future PLC since January 2006, each issue features FXPose galleries from readers, the latest news, reviews, step-by-step workshops and interviews from professional artists.

Issue 107 is a Manga special:

  • Workshops on Manga including “Six key steps to manga magic” from Han-Yuan Yu.
  • “Animate digital paintings” with Photoshop’s motion tools from Paul Tysall.
  • A look at Fernando Forero’s sketchbook.
  • A profile of KARAKTER, the studio behind Game of Thrones, Ryse, and Star Trek: Infinite Space.
  • A 16-page section dedicate to traditional art.

Be sure to check out ImagineFX’s website for more galleries, tutorials, and videos!

The Librarian of Basra

Last month we wrote about this year’s One Book, One Philadelphia selection, The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers — the story of a soldier trying to come to terms with his service in Iraq. The Writer’s Studio is hosting a reading group for the novel tonight at 6:30 and we still have free copies available in the library! We will also continue to accept greeting cards for veterans until the end of this week.

The Librarian of Basra

The Free Library’s One Book program is coming to a close, and as it does we wanted to highlight another story from Iraq. In addition to Powers’s novel, the Free Library chose a book for children called The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter. This book tells the true story of Alia Muhammad Baker, a librarian in Basra who saved her library’s collection from being destroyed by war. It is an incredible story, first reported by Shaila Dewan of the New York Times in 2003, Books Spirited to Safety Before Iraq Library Fire. Stop by the library to check out Winter’s vivid illustrations and Baker’s empowering work! A perfect book to round out One Book, One Philadelphia, as well as Women’s History Month.

Google Art Project + the National Museum of Women in the Arts

Detail of Rachel Ruysch's Roses, Convolvulus, Poppies, and Other Flowers in an Urn on a Stone Ledge (ca. 1680s)

Detail of Rachel Ruysch’s Roses, Convolvulus, Poppies, and Other Flowers in an Urn on a Stone Ledge (ca. 1680s)

Whether you’re traveling for spring break or holed up studying — you can visit the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) online through the Google Art Project! In honor of International Women’s day this past weekend, the NMWA made 59 pieces from their collection available online as high-resolution images. Not only can you zoom into an artwork to see vivid detail, you can use Google’s “museum view” feature to zoom out and move around three floors of the museum.

Also in honor of International Women’s day, the Google Cultural Institute partnered with museums (including NMWA), archives, and cultural groups from around the world to launch “Women in Culture,” a special collection of online exhibitions highlighting achievements by women artists, leaders, and innovators.

Learn more from:
nmwa GCP

Journal of the Month: WSQ

WSQ: Engage

In honor of Women’s History month, we’re featuring the Women’s Studies Quarterly (WSQ) as the journal of the month for March. WSQ is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published twice a year in June and December as a joint project of The Feminist Press and the Center for the Study of Women and Society at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Since 1972, WSQ has been an interdisciplinary forum for the exchange of emerging perspectives on women, gender, and sexuality.

WSQ Volume 41, Numbers 3-4, Fall/Winter 2013 is dedicated to the topic of engagement:

Engagement is entanglement—the drawing together of participants into a cooperating unit. So what does it mean to breach participation? How do the dynamics of social and political engagements inform one another? How are our relationships to institutions and identities defined by the degree to which we engage?

Along with essays, poetry, and fiction, two visual arts projects are included: Contact Sheet of Nike Missiles for a Moon Calendar (2012) photography by artist MPA, and Art, Environment, Action! (2012), by Radhika Subramaniam. Stop by the library to view this journal, and browse the back issues on display!

One Book, One Philadelphia 2014

The Yellow Birds

Connelly Library has free copies of this year’s One Book, One Philadelphia selection, The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers! After reading we invite you to give back by creating a greeting card for a veteran. We will have supplies set aside for cards until March 19, 2014.

“The One Book, One Philadelphia Selection Committee chose the recent National Book Award finalist, The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers for its 2014 selection. Winner of the 2013 PEN/Hemingway Award for First Fiction and a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award, The Yellow Birds has been compared to Tim O’Brien’s classic war novel, The Things They Carried, for its powerful depiction of the truth and tragedy of war. Poet/novelist Powers vividly tells the story of a young soldier struggling to find meaning in his harrowing experiences in Iraq, while suffering profound guilt over his friend and fellow soldier’s death, as well as alienation from community and family upon his return home. According to The New York Times, “Kevin Powers has something to say, something deeply moving about the frailty of man and the brutality of war, and we should all lean closer and listen.”

From the Archives: Petticoated Kickers

Times have changed!
Philadelphia Record

From The Philadelphia Record, Friday November 11, 1892.

Journal of the Month: IRAAA

IRAAA

In honor of African American History month, we’re featuring the International Review of African American Art (IRAAA) as the journal of the month for February. IRAAA is the only periodical spanning the history of African American art from early and modern to contemporary. The journal is published by Hampton University Museum on a quarterly basis. Founded in 1868, the Museum is the oldest African American museum in the United States featuring collections with over 9,000 objects including African American fine arts, traditional African, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Island, and Asian art.

Volume 24, no. 3b is a special issue of the journal published in conjunction with the Dianne Whitfield-Locke and Carnell Locke Collection: Building on Tradition exhibition at the Hampton University Museum. The issue acts like an exhibition catalog and features essays and full-color reproductions. Stop by the library to view this beautiful journal, and browse the back issues on display!

Connelly Staff Recommends: Artificial Hells

Artificial Hells
By Claire Bishop. 2012.
Main Stacks: N6494.I57 B57 2012

Like all good criticism, Claire Bishop’s Artificial Hells adds both context and complexity to the subject it examines. This book traces the lineage of participatory art (the author’s umbrella term for socially engaged art, social practice, political art, etc.) and gives a historical frame of reference for investigating the current incarnations of this form of art-making. Throughout her work, Bishop maintains a critical stance and offers an insightful assessment of this practice. She refuses to unquestioningly accept the social and artistic worth or efficacy of participatory art, and makes a convincing argument of the need to refine the standards by which we judge such works. To her credit as well, Bishop deftly incorporates into her arguments the work of complex theorists and philosophers like Jacques Rancière and Felix Guattari – making their concepts clear and relevant in relation to her position. Artificial Hells is a book well worth reading for those interested in contemporary artistic practice or the intersections of art and social/political action.

Recommended by Matthew Ducmanas, Circulation Supervisor.

Welcome back!

Welcome back! Hope you had a lovely winter break, despite the polar vortex. We have a food and drink policy change in the library:

Beverages with lids and small snacks are permitted in the library’s study areas. Still no food or drink at the computer work stations — but you can park your coffee on top of the picture files. Come find a cozy spot to study!

Food and drink policy

Happy Holidays and Winter Break Hours

Congrats on the end of the semester! Please note our winter break hours:

  • The Library will be closed from December 20 at 5pm until January 6 at 9am.
  • When we re-open, from January 6 – 21 our hours will be Monday-Friday 9am to 5pm.
  • We will be closed Monday, January 20 for the Martin Luther King Holiday.
  • Regular hours will resume on Tuesday, January 21, 2013 at 8am.
  • Last but not least, please remember to return all library material before you leave!

Wishing you a safe and Happy Holiday and New Year. Enjoy winter break!

New York: Rockefeller Center

New York: Rockefeller Center, 1931-33, ARTstor Slide Gallery.



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