Posts Tagged 'archives'

From the Archives: Petticoated Kickers

Times have changed!
Philadelphia Record

From The Philadelphia Record, Friday November 11, 1892.

From the Archives: Joseph Moore Jr.

Aside from being the benefactor and namesake of our school, Joseph Moore, Jr. was also a noted financier, manufacturer, traveler, and author. The Joseph Moore Jr. Collection, housed within our archives, reflects the life and interests of this accomplished individual.

Joseph Moore Jr. in 1894 when he was 45 years old.

Born to Joseph and Cecelia Moore in Philadelphia on July 19, 1849, Moore began his business training early in a dry goods house and later in the carriage building business. Despite a promising manufacturing future ahead of him, the young man chose instead to pursue his long held interests in study, travel and literary work.

In 1876 he withdrew from his positions and began what would end up being twelve years of traveling the world, writing books and articles, and furthering his education. Moore traveled throughout Europe, Asia Minor and Africa, and participated in several archaeological expeditions along the way. His travels around the world continued when he studied French in Blois, German in Hanover and international law under the famous Dr. Francis Wharton in Washington D.C. Upon his return to Philadelphia, Moore lectured to schools on his travels and found time to work for several years on the Evening Bulletin newspaper in Philadelphia and other magazines.

“The American Globe Trotters” – George H. Watson, M.D. & Joseph Moore Jr. in the Fall of 1881, just before the two friends started out on an around the world voyage. Moore was 32 years old at the time of this photograph.

During these productive years he authored a number of books including Outlying Europe and the near Orient and The Queen’s Empire, as well as a series of papers collected as Egyptian Obelisk. In 1882, Moore was made a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and of the French Society of Geography the following year.

Pilgrims to the Jordan. Jerusalem Feb. 9. 1878. Joseph Moore Jr. on far right, George H. Watson far left.

Pilgrims to the Jordan. Jerusalem Feb. 9. 1878. Joseph Moore Jr. on far right, George H. Watson on the far left.

 
In addition to his scientific leanings, Moore was also interested in the arts – particularly in drama and music. In the early 1880s he was chosen as manager of the Edwin Forrest Home for Actors, located in the Holmesburg section of North Philadelphia, of which he served several years as president. Incidentally, this was close to the same time the Philadelphia School of Design for Women moved into the Forrest-Gaul Mansion, Edwin’s former home on Broad and Master streets.

Letter sent to Moore from the renowned physician and author Oliver Wendell Holmes. Holmes was writing in thanks for the copy of "The Queen's Empire" that Moore had sent him. Dated November 25, 1885.

Letter sent to Moore from the renowned physician and author Oliver Wendell Holmes. Holmes was writing in thanks for the copy of “The Queen’s Empire” that Moore had sent him. Dated November 25, 1885.

Reestablishing his residence in Philadelphia, Moore embarked on a successful career in the banking industry and made a name for himself as a prominent financier. He went on to preside as the president of many companies, including the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Company, the Northern Liberties Gas Company, the Philadelphia Clearing House, and the National Bank of Northern Liberties.

Itinerary for Moore's around the world voyage, 1881-1882.

Itinerary for Moore’s around the world voyage, 1881-1882.

Moore became deeply involved with both the financial and cultural institutions of Philadelphia. At various times he acted as a trustee of the Fairmount Park Association, and the director of both the Guarantee Trust and Safe Deposit Company and the Franklin Fire Insurance Company. He served as chairman for many years on the membership committee of the Union League of Philadelphia to which he belonged for forty years, and in 1905 was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Drexel Institute of Philadelphia through his personal friendship with Anthony J. Drexel Jr.

Joseph Moore Jr. in his apartment at 1821 Walnut St, Philadelphia. Photograph undated.

Joseph Moore Jr. in his apartment at 1821 Walnut St, Philadelphia. Photograph undated.

Despite all his activities, Moore managed to lead a full social life. He loved to throw parties for society debutantes and made these an annual event for which he was famous. A lifelong bachelor, he is reputed to have had the handsomest bachelor apartment in Philadelphia, which was filled with books, curios and art objects from the world over. It was in this apartment at 1821 Walnut St. on February 11, 1921, that Joseph Moore Jr. died suddenly of a heart attack at the age of 71 while preparing to receive dinner guests.

Joseph Moore Jr. at Loon Lake in the Adirondacks, NY. Summer 1913.

Joseph Moore Jr. at Loon Lake in the Adirondacks, NY. Summer 1913.

Moore’s only surviving relative was his brother’s widow, Mrs. Alfred Moore. His will stipulated that his entire estate, an amount of $1,000,000, was to be held in trust until the principal amounted to $3,000,000, at which point it should be used to establish and maintain the Moore Institute of Art, Science and Industry. Created as a memorial to his parents Joseph and Cecelia Moore, this school would be for women only and similar in style and operation to the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry.

Plaque commemorating Joseph Moore Jr. and the 1932 merging of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women and the Moore Institute of Art, Science & Industry. Photo undated.

Plaque commemorating Joseph Moore Jr. and the 1932 merging of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women and the Moore Institute of Art, Science & Industry. Photo undated.

The Moore Institute of Art, Science and Industry merged with the Philadelphia School of Design for Women in 1932, creating Moore College of Art.

For more information on Joseph Moore Jr. :

Moore, Joseph, Jr. Autobiographical sketch of Joseph Moore, Jr.  [Philadelphia] : [Moore College of Art], [19??].

Finding Aid. Joseph Moore Jr. Collection. Moore College of Art and Design Archives.

Interested in viewing more materials or using the Archives for your research? Patrons are granted access to the Archives by appointment. Contact the library at 215-965-4054 or library@moore.edu to schedule an appointment.

October 2013 American Archives Month : The Forrest-Gaul Mansion

In celebration of October as American Archives Month, Connelly Library will be sharing a series of posts throughout the month to highlight material from Moore’s Archives. The Moore College of Art and Design Archives documents the history of the college as well as the work and activities of our faculty and alumnae/i.

Exterior of school's home from 1880-1960. ca. 1937.

Broad & Master location. ca. 1937.

In 1880 the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (as the school was then named) moved into the Forrest-Gaul Mansion on the corner of Broad and Masters Streets in Philadelphia. With a steadily increasing student body, the school grew out of five other locations before purchasing the Forrest-Gaul Mansion with money acquired from the sale of its previous building. The property was bought for $45,000, with extensive additions and renovations increasing the cost to $103,000 and providing much needed expanded facilities.

Built ca. 1853, the mansion was originally constructed for the Philadelphia brewer William Gaul. It was bought by the Shakespearean actor Edwin Forrest in 1855 and remained in his possession until his death in 1872.

Exterior of school's home from 1880-1960.

Exterior of school’s home from 1880-1960.

Below, the Philadelphia School of Design for Women’s main office in 1919 with John Sartain’s furnishings. Formerly the reception room and library under the ownership of Edwin Forrest:

School's main office, 1919.

School’s main office, 1919.

Another interior, first floor of the school:

First floor, middle room. ca. 1915.

First floor, middle room. ca. 1915.

Students enjoying a meal in the cafeteria in 1929:

Cafeteria, 1929

The location at Broad and Master Streets also featured an enclosed courtyard where many activities were held. Below, a gathering in the courtyard. Professor Henry Snell can be seen with a raised hat in the center-background:

Gathering in courtyard.

Gathering in courtyard, undated.

Image of the graduation festivities held in the school’s courtyard on June 1st, 1927:

Graduation time, June 1, 1927.

Graduation time, June 1, 1927.

A class draws from a live model in the open air of the courtyard:

Courtyard - class

Drawing class, 1941.

After eighty years the need to expand once again prompted another move for the school. In 1960, after much construction and preparation, the then-named Moore Institute of Art, Science & Industry moved from the Forrest-Gaul Mansion to its current home on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at Logan Square. The Forrest-Gaul Mansion has since been placed on a number of historic registries and currently houses Philadelphia’s Freedom Theatre.

For more information on Moore’s history and past homes:

Design for women: a history of the Moore College of Art. Wynnewood, Pa. : Livingston Pub. Co., 1968.

Hoffman, Sharon G. Moore College of Art & Design. Charleston, SC : Arcadia Pub., 2008.

Walls, Nina de Angeli. Art, industry, and women’s education in Philadelphia.Westport, Conn. : Bergin & Garvey, 2001.

Interested in viewing more materials or using the Archives for your research? Patrons are granted access to the Archives by appointment. Contact the library at 215-965-4054 or library@moore.edu to schedule an appointment.

Women’s History Month at Moore: Anna Russell Jones

To conclude this series in celebration of Women’s History Month, we would like to present a contemporary of Alice Neel, Anna Russell Jones (1902-1995).

Anna Russell Jones in 1987

Anna Russell Jones in 1987

In 1920 Anna Russell Jones was the first African American woman to receive a scholarship from the Philadelphia Board of Education to attend Philadelphia School of Design for Women (PSDW). In 1925 she was the first African American woman to graduate from PSDW. She was among the first women to work as a freelance designer in Philadelphia and New York in the 1920s and 1930s. She was (or is believed to have been) the first African American woman from Philadelphia to enlist in the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC) in 1942. Her ambition was boundless.

“She always told me I could do anything I wanted to do.” Anna Russell Jones, speaking of Dean Harriet Sartain.

1924-1925 PSDW Catalog Cover design by Anna Russell

1924-1925 PSDW catalog cover design by Anna Russell

Anna Russell Jones was born in Jersey City, NJ, the youngest daughter of a Pullman porter on the Pennsylvania Railroad. After her father’s death in 1911, her family moved to Philadelphia. She graduated from William Penn High School for Girls in 1920, and against convention and her family’s advice, she applied for college. With her scholarship from the Board of Education Jones attended PSDW for Textile Design. Upon graduation in 1924, she won three awards: for original rug design, original wallpaper design, and for her design of the 1924-1925 PSDW catalog cover. College Dean Harriet Sartain helped her find work as an in-house designer at James G. Speck Studio, a well established carpet design studio in Philadelphia.

“You see, I had three strikes against me: I was a woman, black, and a freelancer.”

In 1928, after four years at Speck Studio, Jones set out on her own. She established her own studio and began to seek commissions for her designs in Philadelphia and New York. This was not just unusual for the time, but almost unheard of. Gradually the Great Depression ended her freelance career, but she did manage to sell her wallpaper and carpet designs until 1935, no small feat for an African American woman in the architecture and design industry during the 1930s.

“I wanted to do it, so I did.”

Jones (left) working as a graphic artist for the WAAC

Jones (left) working as a graphic artist for the WAAC

In 1942 Jones decided to enlist in the newly formed Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC) — she was 40 years old. For three years she was stationed in Fort Huachuca, AZ, where she designed maps, posters and booklets for military publications. Before she was honorably discharged in 1945 Jones received the WAAC Service Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. After the war she studied medical illustration at Howard University, and in the 1950s she worked as a licensed practical nurse at Hahnemann University Hospital. In 1952 she married William Albert Marsh Jones Jr., a former elevator operator and Democratic committeeman in Germantown.

In 1986 Anna was awarded the Honor of Excellence Award from the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum (now African American Museum) in Philadelphia. And in 1987 she received an Honorary Degree, Doctor of Fine Arts, from Moore College of Art. She continued to paint until her death in 1995 at the age of 92.

For further information:

McMillan, Janet. “Success Against the Odds.” Philadelphia Inquirer, (Philadelphia, PA), November 23, 1986.

Richberg, Barbara J. “Anna R. Jones, 92, Pioneer In Many Fields.” Philadelphia Inquirer, (Philadelphia, PA), April 5, 1995.

Walls, Nina de Angeli. Art, industry, and women’s education in Philadelphia. Westport, Conn. : Bergin & Garvey, 2001.

Women designers in the U.S.A, 1900-2000: diversity and difference. Edited by Pat Kirkham. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000.

Women’s History Month at Moore: Emily Sartain

The history of Moore is one that has largely been driven by exceptional women, and we’d like to share a few of their stories in celebration of Women’s History Month. We hope to highlight each woman’s unique and lasting contributions to the world of art, and how each woman’s experiences at Moore influenced her along the way.

Emily Sartain, 1918 catalogEmily Sartain (1841-1927) was the daughter of famous Philadelphia engraver and printer John Sartain, colleague of Mary Cassatt, and close friend of Thomas Eakins. Her primary education in the arts came from an apprenticeship at her father’s studio, and she also attended classes at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. She was the first woman to practice the difficult art of mezzotint, and it was largely through sales of her engraving work that she was able to finance her studies in Europe from 1871-1875. She supported herself for fifteen years as a freelance engraver, portrait artist, and teacher, and was an important figure in local women’s clubs in Philadelphia.

 

Sartain's certificate from the Philadelphia International Exhibition of 1876 for achievement in painting.

Sartain’s certificate from the Philadelphia International Exhibition of 1876 for achievement in painting.

In 1886 Emily Sartain was appointed principal of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women. Prior to her appointment, the influence of women at the school had declined gradually following the departure of Sarah Peter, and most advanced-level instructors were men. Under Sartain, the hiring of instructors was tightly controlled, and the majority of female faculty members were chosen from alumnae of the school. She also revamped the school’s curriculum to include more challenging techniques, adopting the “French method” of drawing from life and introducing figure drawing classes.

View of the salon in the Philadelphia School of Design's building at Broad & Master Streets, signed by Sartain.

View of the salon in the Philadelphia School of Design’s building at Broad & Master Streets, signed by Sartain.

Sartain proved to be a leader in women’s arts education through her numerous appearances, speaking engagements, and press releases, and in doing so she raised the school’s profile locally and abroad. She was one of the first women to be appointed to the Fine Art Jury at the Chicago Columbian Exposition in 1893. She founded the Plastic Club in 1897, which is today one of the oldest art organizations for women in the United States. In a speech given at the International Congress of Women in London in 1899, Sartain outlined her belief that an education in the arts empowered women by creating opportunities for financial independence in the working world, and this belief greatly influenced the work she did for the Philadelphia School of Design for Women. She retired as principal in 1920, and her successor was her niece, Harriet Sartain. Emily Sartain died in 1927.

The library owns a large collection of materials from the Sartain family in its archives, including correspondence, sketchbooks, engravings, and more. If Emily Sartain’s pioneering career inspires you, contact our archivist Joelen Pastva (jpastva@moore.edu) to set up an appointment to learn more about Sartain’s fascinating life.

For more information:
Design for women: a history of the Moore College of Art. Wynnewood, Pa. : Livingston Pub. Co., 1968.

Walls, Nina de Angeli. Art, industry, and women’s education in Philadelphia. Westport, Conn. : Bergin & Garvey, 2001.

Wright, Helena E. With pen & graver: women graphic artists before 1900. Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution, 1995.

October 2012 American Archives Month: Alumnae Costume Balls

In celebration of October as American Archives Month, Connelly Library will be sharing a series of posts throughout the month to highlight material from Moore’s Archives. The Moore College of Art and Design Archives documents the history of the college as well as the work and activities of our faculty and alumnae/i.

Annual Alumnae Association Balls: 1924-1930

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Along with records and manuscripts, Moore’s archives also house a rich collection of images detailing our college’s past. These photographs document the lively costume balls organized by the school’s Alumnae Association and attended by students and staff alike.

Interested in viewing more materials or using the Archives for your research? Patrons are granted access to the Archives by appointment. Contact Joelen Pastva, Cataloging & Metadata Librarian at 215-965-4055 or jpastva@moore.edu to schedule an appointment.

October 2012 American Archives Month: Catalog Covers

In celebration of October as American Archives Month, Connelly Library will be sharing a series of posts to highlight material from Moore’s Archives. The Moore College of Art and Design Archives documents the history of the college as well as the work and activities of our faculty and alumnae/i.

Moore’s Archives holds a collection of course catalogs dating back to 1854. This slideshow of the catalog covers shows the college’s transformation from Philadelphia School of Design for Women, to Moore Institute of Art, and finally to Moore College of Art & Design.

Interested in viewing more materials or using the Archives for your research? Patrons are granted access to the Archives by appointment. Contact Joelen Pastva, Cataloging & Metadata Librarian at 215-965-4055 or jpastva@moore.edu to schedule an appointment.


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