Posts Tagged 'curatorial studies'

Journal of the Month: IRAAA

IRAAA

In honor of African American History month, we’re featuring the International Review of African American Art (IRAAA) as the journal of the month for February. IRAAA is the only periodical spanning the history of African American art from early and modern to contemporary. The journal is published by Hampton University Museum on a quarterly basis. Founded in 1868, the Museum is the oldest African American museum in the United States featuring collections with over 9,000 objects including African American fine arts, traditional African, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Island, and Asian art.

Volume 24, no. 3b is a special issue of the journal published in conjunction with the Dianne Whitfield-Locke and Carnell Locke Collection: Building on Tradition exhibition at the Hampton University Museum. The issue acts like an exhibition catalog and features essays and full-color reproductions. Stop by the library to view this beautiful journal, and browse the back issues on display!

Journal of the Month: Journal of Curatorial Studies

Journal of Curatorial Studies

The Journal of the Month for September 2013 is new to the library’s collection. The Journal of Curatorial Studies is an international, peer-reviewed publication that explores the cultural functioning of curating and its relation to exhibitions, institutions, audiences, aesthetics and display culture. The journal supports in-depth investigations of contemporary and historical exhibitions, case studies of curators and their engagements, and analyses of the critical dynamics influencing the production of exhibitions in art and broader display culture. The Journal of Curatorial Studies publishes both thematic and open issues, and features research articles, contemporary and historical case studies, interviews with curators, artists and theorists, and reviews of books, exhibitions and conferences.

Volume 2, No. 2 Features:

“Constant Redistribution: A Roundtable on Feminism, Art and the Curatorial Field”—This discussion between nine curators, theorists and art historians addresses some of the contemporary issues related to feminism and curating.

“Exhibition Histories and New Media Behaviours”—For future critical art histories of participatory art exhibitions, the author proposes that an effective method of evaluation would include a combination of documentary sources, such as installation images, audience data, and crowd-sourced documentation.

Plus Exhibition, Book, Website and Conference Reviews!

Be sure to browse this month’s journal, along with the rest of our journal collection!

Google Art Project Launches

Google has announced their new Google Art Project, an exciting development for the arts community worldwide. The project combines “Street View” for selected museums with artworks in high resolution. From Google’s Official Blog: “You’ll find a selection of super high-resolution images of famous works of art as well as more than a thousand other images, by more than 400 artists—all in one place. And with Street View technology, you can take a virtual tour inside 17 of the world’s most acclaimed art museums.”

While the project is currently limited in size and scope (approximately 1000 works are represented), it offers a great deal of potential, not to mention hours of browsing for anyone interested in the arts. After all, who could resist a virtual visit to the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg at their convenience? View the video below for brief introduction to the Google Art Project.


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New in the Library

The architecture of the Barnes Foundation : gallery in a garden, garden in a gallery / Tod Williams, Billie Tsien ; edited by Octavia Giovannini-Torelli ; principal photography by Michael Moran.
Abstraction / edited by Maria Lind.
Drape drape 3 / Hisako Sato.

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